Preaching grace


"Perhaps the most offensive and scandalous aspect of speaking the Word of God in our time may be the notion of grace, which announces that from beginning to end our human lives are not of our own making, management, or control. In learning to confess that we are sinful creatures of a gracious God, we discover that our lives are constituted as gifts rather than possessions, whose purpose is to know and love our Creator.

"In Christian worship, then, we acknowledge our grateful dependence according to the particular wisdom displayed in the self-giving of Christ, through which the Spirit evokes responsiveness and receptivity to the God who speaks both creation and salvation. Thus, in a time that calls for a strong, robust message of faith, hope, and love, there is no 'deeply felt need' more urgent than proclaiming the 'foolishness' of the cross - the power and wisdom of the gospel that creates a people of loving praise and glad obedience in whom the Spirit bears witness to the flourishing of humanity before God."


Comments

  1. Actually, Jesus never once preaches grace. Show me one scripture in the New Testament where Jesus mentions grace? It doesn't exist. Grace comes into the "gospel" through Paul's writings, yet early Clementine writings suggest that Paul is an imposter, that he is really, Simon Magus.
    Who are we to trust? Our Lord and Saviour, who taught obedience to the LAW? OR a false imposter teaching grace?

    I know who I trust.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Robert,

    I must respectfully disagree with your assertion. I find in the Holy Scriptures that Jesus came preaching (declaring) good news for the impoverished, freedom for the imprisoned, restoration of sight for the blind and release from bondage for the oppressed. Moreover, he proclaimed "the year of the Lord's favor." (Luke 4:18-19).

    In Mat. 11:28, Jesus invites those who are weary and burdened by the yoke of the law, to instead put on his yoke - the yoke of the truly gracious one, who is "gentle and humble in heart." It is in following Jesus that they will find the true "rest" of God.

    If all this is not a proclamation by Jesus of the grace of God, I don't know what is.

    We do well to listen to Jesus' beloved disciple, John, who declared Jesus to be God become flesh, and the one who is with us "full of grace and truth." (John 1:14).

    ReplyDelete
  3. Anonymous12/17/2009

    Jesus left us a model to follow...it is by following him 'closely' that we come into that figuretive 'Sabbath Rest' that is of the spirit (not of the flesh)..Jesus is the 'exact representation of his Father'...a mirror image and that's how we come to know God and avoid the coming destruction 'for those who do not know God...or obey the good news'...Jesus is not almighty God...he would blanche at the inference...and this coming from an exCatholic...who has a 37 year ministry amongst Jehovah's Witnesses. Repectfully submitted:

    ReplyDelete
  4. Dear Anonymous,

    It's not clear to me - are you suggesting that Jesus is not God? You mention a ministry among Jehovah's Witnesses, who deny Jesus' divinity. Is that also your position?

    In this blog we proclaim the biblical witness that Jesus is the incarnate, eternal Son of God - fully God and fully human - two natures in one person.

    This crucified, risen and ascended Lord includes all humanity in his love and life, and thus we proclaim that he is far more than a "model to follow" - rather he actively shares his life with us, in the Spirit, as our Living High Priest. Indeed, Jesus is our life, and it is his grace that we proclaim.

    ReplyDelete
  5. Sounds like anon is Unitarian.

    You a PKG member Anon?

    ReplyDelete

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